Please fill out our New Client Questionnaire form if you are a new visitor on the website.

(718) 737-9669 Book A Strategy Session

General Blog

  • Published: December 11, 2020

Nearly a quarter of the children under 18 live in a single-parent home in the U.S., according to a Pew Research Center report. During the pandemic, many single-income homes are facing unemployment without the safety net of older family members, who can't risk helping with child care. Some are turning to organizations like Texas-based Single Parent Advocate for help. Single mom Stacie Poythress founded Single Parent Advocate to provide resources and community families like hers. Poythress talks about the ‘five Ds’ that connect single-parent families: the death of a spouse, divorce, disease, disability or a decision. “Those types of situations…Read More

  • Published: December 11, 2020

NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Homeira Qaderi about her memoir Dancing in the Mosque: An Afghan Mother's Letter to Her Son, the story motherhood and womanhood in her native country. Homeira Qaderi's memoir is a public cry to be recognized and remembered by the person who would ordinarily be closest to her in life, her son, Siawash. Dr. Qaderi, an acclaimed writer, professor of literature, an adviser on equity for women to the Afghan government, had her son taken from her arms after her husband declared their marriage over in a three-word text message - divorce, divorce, divorce - when…Read More

  • Published: December 11, 2020

Not many people leave ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities. Most who do try to keep it secret, because, if everyone knew, the marriage prospects of their siblings could be irreparably damaged. The shame of leaving is very great. It is said that anyone who leaves must be a ruined person—penniless, homeless, probably on drugs, maybe a prostitute, living like an animal, for carnal appetites alone, like the goyim, or else mentally ill. It’s true that leaving is traumatic. Many people do fall apart at first. There are suicides, and near-suicides. Some who lose their faith would give anything to have it back.…Read More

  • Published: December 11, 2020

This time of year, family law practitioners are often inundated with questions from clients re vacation schedules, travel itineraries. Holiday Season Past: Some of the routine issues we normally deal with are: When does my holiday vacation start? Who gets Christmas this year? I thought I got Christmas every year? When can I get an itinerary from the other parent who is traveling with the children? What if I don’t get an itinerary? Can I stop the trip? What if he (she) refuses to turn over the passport(s), the child(ren) for my vacation? Can you or the court force him…Read More

  • Published: December 11, 2020

If life were fair, Benjamin and his sister, Olivia, would be spending this sunny July day fishing with their father and riding bikes around the small town in northern Ontario that they consider home. Instead, they are trapped in a townhouse in an ersatz Alpine village with a therapist and the mother they loathe, along with her partner and his two sons. The day begins at 9 a.m., when a blond, middle-aged woman greets them by the unlit fireplace in the living room. She’s the therapist, and she tells the kids that while they’re here at the Family Bridges program,…Read More

  • Published: November 26, 2020

It was a hard year that just kept getting harder. There were maternity wards that transformed into ghost towns overnight, as visitor restrictions tightened and grandparents-to-be canceled flights. Schools closed, then reopened, only to close again, sending parents scrambling for child care, wrangling remote learners and struggling to do their own jobs. Millions of families lost income and many lost loved ones. For parents in particular, this year has meant recalibrating time and again. Yet, there was also joy — cobbled-together peaceful moments — amid a steady thrum of chaos, which isn’t letting up. We asked mothers and fathers across the country what parenting has been…Read More

  • Published: November 26, 2020

Lhamo, a Tibetan farmer in southwestern China, lived her life mostly outdoors and shared it online, posting videos of herself cooking, singing and picking herbs in the mountains around her village. By this fall, she had about 200,000 followers, many of whom praised her as cheerful and hardworking. Over 400 of them were watching one evening in mid-September as Ms. Lhamo, 30, streamed a video live from her kitchen on Douyin, the Chinese version of the TikTok app. Suddenly, a man stormed in and Ms. Lhamo screamed. Then the screen went dark. When Ms. Lhamo’s sister Dolma arrived at the…Read More

  • Published: November 26, 2020

Like many married and working couples first confronting the pandemic, Bianca Flokstra and Victor Udoewa tried to go on with their lives as normal. Flokstra continued to work full time while taking care of their kids, ages 4 and 2. She also handled most of the housework, with her husband helping from time to time. It didn't work. "Those first couple of months were really hard," Flokstra says. "There was ... a lot of fighting. A lot of tears." The pandemic has upended many aspects of domestic life, and that has brought new attention to one of the most enduring…Read More

  • Published: November 26, 2020

My ex and I aren’t friends — amicable might be pushing it — but in the four years since we split, we have navigated new homes, new partners and our 6-year-old son entering the public school system with minimal drama. When the pandemic hit and schools shut down, I almost felt guilty about my ability to ship my kid off to his father’s for five-day stretches while married friends lost sleep and fought with their husbands about whose turn it was to supervise virtual geometry. Then, in late August, I got word that my son’s school district would be opening…Read More

  • Published: November 26, 2020

Nellie Riether, a single mom from Ringwood, N.J., faces a stark choice: raid her retirement savings or uproot her kids from home and move in with her sister. "To be honest, it's mortifying and embarrassing at 46 years old to say I'm going to have to move in with my sister," she says. "Emotionally, it's a bit of a failure." Riether has been out of work since April, when she was furloughed from her job in office building design. She can't pay the rent much longer, and she's worried about her kids, who are 13 and 15. The state jobless…Read More

Page 2 of 6:«12345... 6»
Accessibility Close Menu
× Accessibility Menu CTRL+U